Freaks & Geeks: A More Glowing Report

2007-02-04 00:00

So I posted a bit ago that I was going through the show “Freaks & Geeks”. I’ve finished now, and I have to say, the show impressed me more and more, the more of it I watched.

At first, I thought the show was pretty “high school stereotypes” and “cliche situations,” but it goes deeper than that. The characters start out as stereotypes because it’s easy to ignore them when they’re not part of a story, but there are “real people” (in a manner of speaking) behind them. As each character got a story or two to him or herself it became very obvious that the character was intended to be that from the start. What’s so wonderful about it is the real sense of discovery of people when you realize you’ve been selling each of the characters short, in turn, throughout watching the show. Sure, it makes you feel kind of bad at judging people, but it does make you realize that we do it every day. For better or worse we judge people based on who they hang out with, what they look like, and where we find them. We even try to hide who we hang out with, what we “really” look like, and where we go all the time just so people think certain things about us. Not everyone does that all the time, but we all try to do it a little bit.

I happen to have been lucky enough to go to a high school with very little clique-ish-ness, but even within a very healthy school community there are groups, and not everyone knows everyone else (especially at larger schools, mine was rather small.). It was easy to recognize the dynamics that take place in every social setting, not just high school, not just parents and teens. Thankfully, I’ve not had to deal with nearly as many or as difficult problems as the characters in the show, but I know I’ve had to deal with a few of them, if only barely or not as severely. “Freaks” really shows people who act like people really do, dealing with things much worse than most people ever have to. It’s great to learn from, if only because eventually we all have crises to work through, and we don’t always know how we can deal with them. Plus, it never hurts to get vindicated in your desire to not do homework. I’m certainly avoiding doing a buch of writing for classes by writing a critical analysis of a television show I just hauled through avoiding writing homework. Whether hypocritical or not, I’d rather be thinking for myself, on what I’ve decided to ingest (the best word to describe the collective thing people do when they experience or watch or read some media or other) of my own free will. (The debate of the actual or practical existence of which I will leave to another day.)

Now, off to not avoid responsibility, not be passive-aggressive with my friends, and to do my own thing, expore myself, and all that other hippie-like stuff that’s actually reasonably useful. But no drugs, or random partying. That’s for losers. </sarcasm>

Note: This entry imported via Facebook's Note feature from my old website, much is expected to be broken.